Demographics

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 7,481 people, 2,413 households, and 1,747 families residing in the town. The population density was 580.0 inhabitants per square mile (223.9 /km2). There were 2,458 housing units at an average density of 190.6 per square mile (73.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 91.63% White, 5.33% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.63% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.77% of the population. There were 2,413 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.5% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.04. In the town the population was spread out with 21.4% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 22.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 130.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 139.0 males. [The population of West Boylston (7481 in 2000) includes the approximately 1400 male residents of the Worcester County House of Correction; about 20% of the town's recorded population. So it would seem that West Boylston has about 30% more men than women (139 men for every 100 women) but that statistic is misleading.] The median income for a household in the town was $53,777, and the median income for a family was $69,100. Males had a median income of $49,963 versus $32,557 for females. The per capita income for the town was $22,899. About 2.3% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 1 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (the only categories for ethnicity).[1][2] The racial categories represent a social-political construct for the race or races that respondents consider themselves to be and "generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country."[3] OMB defines the concept of race as outlined for the US Census as not "scientific or anthropological" and takes into account "social and cultural characteristics as well as ancestry", using "appropriate scientific methodologies" that are not "primarily biological or genetic in reference."[4] The race categories include both racial and national-origin groups. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (the only categories for ethnicity).[1][2] The racial categories represent a social-political construct for the race or races that respondents consider themselves to be and "generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country."[3] OMB defines the concept of race as outlined for the US Census as not "scientific or anthropological" and takes into account "social and cultural characteristics as well as ancestry", using "appropriate scientific methodologies" that are not "primarily biological or genetic in reference."[4] The race categories include both racial and national-origin groups.

 

Bonfire Sept 20


Fireworks Sept 21
 

West Boylston School
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